top of page
DSC00355_edited_edited.jpg

My passion was to become an electrical power engineer and design huge power transformers that, back then, I used to see on big trucks rolling down the highways. Although I knew there were few women studying this major at university, I did not let that stop me.

Zahra Rahimpour

Renewable and Distributed Energy Researcher

WHO IS SHE:

I am a Renewable and Distributed Energy Researcherat UNSW. The focus of my research is on the technical and economic impacts of distributed energy resources on electricity networks using data analysis and pattern recognition techniques. Recently, I have submitted my PhD thesis in electrical engineering. During my PhD and master's degrees at the University of Sydney, I studied how buildings' envelopes can be exploited as a storage system and used with rooftop PV systems to reduce the electricity cost of householders while offering them comfortable indoor temperature. Before joining the University of Sydney, I worked for ten years as a power transformer design engineer. This included three years at Ampcontrol transformers in Newcastle and seven years at in Iran Transfo Corporation in Iran. As a power transformer design engineer, I designed oil-type electrical transformers for transmission and distribution electricity networks and dry-type transformers for the mining sector of Australia. During my work experience in both Iran and Australia, I always was the only woman in the engineering team.

Zahra Rahimpour

KEY STRENGTHS:

Creativity, problem-solving, hardworking, attention to detail, always ready to take on new challenges, and thinking out of the box!

WHY CHOOSE THIS DEGREE?

I had two main motivations. One was my cousin, who was studying electrical power engineering at the time, and he inspired me to become an electrical engineer. My second motivation was that the Middle East's largest power transformer manufacturer was located in the city where I resided. My passion was to become an electrical power engineer and design huge power transformers that, back then, I used to see on big trucks rolling down the highways. Although I knew there were few women studying this major at university, I did not let that stop me.
Construction plan

My Journey

Where it all started for me

Finished High School

What did I end up studying?

I worked for ten years as a power transformer design engineer. This included three years at Ampcontrol transformers in Newcastle and seven years at in Iran Transfo Corporation in Iran.

Entering the industry

Currently a Renewable and Distributed Energy Researcher at UNSW. The focus of my research is on the technical and economic impacts of distributed energy resources on electricity networks using data analysis and pattern recognition techniques.

My previous work experience

Studied at the
University of Zanjan completing a Bachelor's degree, (Electrical and Electronics Engineering)

My work placement experience

Completed a PhD Thesis in Electrical Engineering from the University of Sydney

What I'm doing now

My advice for anyone looking to get into the industry?

Take advantage of as many work placements and industry speakers at API events as possible - so you can get a good understanding of the many areas you can specialise in.

How to connect with

Zahra Rahimpour

View more profiles

Abby Biles

"As we confront Australia's national skills shortage and the pressure to achieve Net Zero, the inclusion of women in the power industry becomes even more crucial. By leveraging diverse talents and perspectives, we can address these challenges. There are so many incredible women out there who's skills are needed in this space they just need the industry to support them in return."

Read more

Liana Lidden-Verney

"There is no gender monopoly on the skills needed in the industry. By having a workforce with diverse perspectives and experiences, we fuel innovation and innovation is exactly what this industry will be reliant on for generations to come."

Read more

Katrina Thomlinson

"There is value in every industry from diversity of thought and one way to bring diversity is employ more women in the workforce. Women bring different values, perspectives and approaches to solve the problems of today and into the future."

Read more

What can I do next?

No matter if you're at high-school or at university, we have great programs and resources to get you started on your journey towards power engineering!

High School Students
University Students

Follow us to stay updated: 

bottom of page